2201 Kipling Street Suite 201

Lakewood, CO 80215

midwives@meadowsweetmidwifery.com

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Tel: (720) 606-9996

© 2018 by Meadowsweet Midwifery.

Vaginal Birth After Cesarean

Are you looking for help to avoid another cesarean?

Have you had a cesarean section? Are you looking for help in avoiding another one? We are experienced with VBAC and support mothers who wish to have this option.  As registered midwives, we are, in some cases, able to take clients for VBAC.   According to the Colorado state guidelines, you may qualify for a VBAC at home if you meet the following qualifications:

 

  • no c-section within 18 months

  • if you have prior multiple c-sections a subsequent vaginal delivery has already occurred

  • no prior classical or vertical incision

 

 Please contact us to discuss your prior history and we will be happy to answer any questions.

Please click here for a list of 13 Myths about VBAC for information about the safety of VBAC.

 

According to vbacfacts.org:

 

 The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG, 2010) says VBAC is a “safe and appropriate choice for most women” with one prior cesarean and for “some women” with two prior cesareans. The National Institutes of Health (2010) says “trial of labor is a reasonable option for many pregnant women with one prior low transverse uterine incision.” There was even a presentation at the 2010 NIH VBAC Conference discussing how there are not enough anesthesiologists in the United States to provide 24/7 coverage of all birthing units nationwide, but that VBAC could be offered safely nonetheless. There are hospitals and hospital-based care providers who actively support VBAC. Yet not all women have access to such facilities and professionals. So increasingly, more women are opting to birth at home because they feel like they have no other choice or due to the many benefits of home birth. As the CDC recently reported, “After a decline from 1990 to 2004, the percentage of U.S. births that occurred at home increased by 29%, from 0.56% of births in 2004 to 0.72% in 2009″ (MacDorman, 2012). Women feel like if they go to the hospital, they will be railroaded into another cesarean because their OB is not really supportive. That is the risk of hospital birth.

 

Please click here to read the full article.